Boats Against the Current

And still we keep on creating, though myself not as much I would like of late.  Lacking friends with benefits, I turned earlier this summer to friends with books out.

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Marcia Trahan’s memoir Mercy: A Memoir of Medical Trauma and True Crime Obsession explores her own medical ordeals, her obsession with true crime on television, women’s bodies as commodities in society, and her own identity. Sue William Silverman’s How to Survive Death and Other Inconveniences, a memoir in essays, explores assault and addiction, and masterfully illustrates how trauma can stalk a person’s life, sometimes in brief shadow, sometimes in full-blown flashback.

I like to call Lee Martin’s recent fiction “Southern Illinois Noir,” although whether he likes me to call it that is not something I have asked. In his recent novels and story collections, momentarily untethered people make rash decisions that lead to outsized consequences; sometimes, as in his recent Yours, Jean, based on a true crime, an entire town acts as both chorus and cast.

There has been little progress on my own work, except for publicity for and correction of the proof of Censorettes. While I have little to complain about (I know; I am lucky!), how rarely that stops me. I am able to work from home, and I am putting in more hours than ever, including Sunday afternoon, which at least provided peaceful, uninterrupted time. I am attending a virtual writing conference next week, and need to get my day job ducks in a row.

Once I was done, a walk to the park was in order. My new favorite place is Chateau Le Woof, because I love the ingenuity the owners had of turning a former industrial parking garage into a dog-friendly cafe, open to the street, across from the park. On the way there, I met a woman and her dog. The owner and I nodded, but the dog did a full-fledged double take and pulled her back to where I was sitting. “YOU AGAIN!” he would have cried, had we both been human, and cast in a romantic comedy where in an earlier scene I would have stolen his parking spot, or spoiled some meticulously prepared model just before the big presentation. He gazed at me with ardent brown eyes through dirty white fur.

“Hi,” I said to the dog, as his owner tried to break his stare and pull him along, chuckling apologies to me. I said to the dog, “Hot out, right?” and then, as a man walked by, “Okay, I’m really not that interesting. Try that guy.”

Because of allergies, I’m not a petter of strange dogs, particularly ones who regard me like an antic Cary Grant regarding the leopard, if not Katherine Hepburn, in Bringing Up Baby.

Then, I said to the dog, “Alright,” and got up to walk with them to the park.

“You a Vermonter?” asked the woman.

Strange question, I thought, until I looked down and realized I was wearing a Vermont t-shirt. I still think it is a strange question. People don’t necessarily wear t-shirts advertising their home, so they can be returned if life becomes wayward. People visit places and buy t-shirts to show they were there; there is even a cliché about it. But I once wore a t-shirt I bought in Canada on a Brooklyn riverside bike tour, and people kept asking me what province I was from, or telling me how much they liked Quebec.

The woman was herself from Burlington. I told her, then, about Vermont, how I attend the Vermont College of Fine Arts Postgraduate Conference in Montpelier, Vermont every summer (where I met the above authors, Lee, Marcia and Sue), how this year it is virtual, which means I am not at my picnic table on the town green at the top of the hill, or hanging out in the Cafe Anna with my friends, but in my apartment, in my same crippling home desk chair, a captive of Zoom, with pandemic hair and bad lighting (I know; I am lucky!)

Maybe I am a Vermonter.

We turned the corner on Vernon Boulevard, where some string players were entertaining an insufficiently socially distanced group and their dogs.

My canine love interest took off across the park, a sculpture park, which is currently home to this monolith.

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“Because Once You Enter My House, It Becomes Our House,” by Jeffrey Gibson. Read more about it here

The music of the strings lured me out of the park and I stood among my insufficiently socially distanced neighbors, enriched that day by so much heat and creativity.  We are isolated; still, we create. We are ordered to keep a distance; still, we connect. We experience ordeals and suffer from bad decisions; still, we write books (albeit ones with blood-splattered covers).ICan'tHelpFallinginLovewithYou

The string players launched into I Can’t Help Falling in Love with You, alternating the melody line, first the pizzicato, then the legato. We all grew very still and drank it in. We knew we were lucky.

 

2 responses

  1. Rachael Warecki | Reply

    Can I just say how much I always enjoy your newsletter? It is always so thoroughly and clearly in your voice that I imagine us having a conversation while trudging to the library among Lake Forest blondes, or eating popcorn in the sports bar with the train track by the ceiling, or sitting on opposite ends of the long dining table while watching the snow fall and trying to ignore the creepy Bird Girl statue.

    On Mon, Aug 3, 2020, 6:18 PM Elizabeth Bales Frank wrote:

    > Elizabeth Frank posted: “And still we keep on creating, though myself not > as much I would like of late. Lacking friends with benefits, I turned > earlier this summer to friends with books out. Marcia Trahan’s memoir > Mercy: A Memoir of Medical Trauma and True Crime Obsession exp” >

    Like

  2. Becky Northcutt | Reply

    I know that I’m lucky, too, every time I get to read something you have written.

    Like

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