Now There Would Be Time for Everything

How’s your world, everyone?

Here is a photo of mine, when I look out on it.

viewfromthewindow

I am two blocks from a branch of Mount Sinai Hospital, as my friends and social media friends know. A branch where they have erected emergency COVID testing tents. In three minutes from the time I am writing the words “in three minutes,” the applause will start, the applause for the health care workers at the shift change. It seems to grow in duration and in volume every day.

I begin each day by opening the window and turning on the classical music station. I was fortunate in that my remote control broke one week into this isolation, so I no longer have the option to channel surf or listen to live press conferences.

There it is, the applause. Banging of pots and pans, honking of horns.

It should lift up my spirits, but instead it burrows deep into my sinews, like a fishhook, not a knife. This is a trauma not easily extracted. This is an anger not easily assuaged.

When I was on an “Unworkshop” retreat at the Highlights Foundation last fall, I met a woman named Heather Dean Brewer. The Highlights Foundation retreats take place in Pennsylvania on a rural property outside Honesdale, Pennsylvania. Because I admittedly live in an NYC bubble, Honesdale was the first town where I saw an un-ironic “Make America Great Again” sign posted in the window of a small-town business.

Heather was at Highlights for a workshop.(By way of explanation, Highlights offers a vigorous catalogue of workshops for children and young adult authors and illustrators, but also offers space and meals for any writer who might need time and space.) I was there for time and space. Heather was there for a workshop. She is the author of this happy little book which I bought for my sister’s birthday. (Spoiler!)

Heather was sweet enough to send me a bottle of wine from distant Michigan.

giftfromHeather

My cultural references these days are Jimmy Stewart in Rear Window, staring out the window and speculating on the neighbors. And Katherine Anne Porter’s Pale Horse, Pale Rider, a short novel about the 1918 pandemic which has been written about by wiser heads than mine, for example, here. I cannot look at it now, not with the sirens screaming in the background, but nor can I forget the story’s final line: “Now there would be time for everything.”

A month ago, my biggest concern was that the 92nd St. Y would cancel the appearance of Dame Hilary Mantel, who was to discuss the third book in her Cromwell trilogy, The Mirror and the Light. I had been looking forward to her talk for months; bonus points for it occurring on my birthday. But of course, it was cancelled. Instead, I ordered the book from The Astoria Bookshop, my local indie, on the last day it was operating live. It is still operating virtually, if you would like to support it.

I am having a hard time concentrating on The Mirror and the Light. I loved the first two volumes. I am pretty well versed in the Tudors. But despite the fact that the circumstances are dire, and that we know how this will end (it’s the world of Henry VIII, after all), I have trouble following along and perhaps need a lighter book.

But one line did resonate. Among so much speculation about succession to the throne, one character observes that it is treasonous even to wonder about the future. “We are trapped,” she sighs, “in the hours we occupy.”

4 responses

  1. Wonderful post. I find it ironic to think that “Now there will be time for everything” could be a mantra as I am working from home and feel like I have no time for anything. What used to take a few minutes to complete in the office now can take upwards of half an hour with home systems having a slow connection to the office. Maddening. And yes, compared to the full stop of employment for so many, mine is a first world complaint that drives me to a strong cocktail by the end of the day.

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  2. Linda East Brady | Reply

    Loved this essay.

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  3. mykinderquotes1 | Reply

    I wish I could somehow lighten the load. Thanks for sharing your experience. I’m sorry for your isolation.

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  4. […] makes me think that I might want to read William Maxwell’s They Came Like Swallows. And my friend Elizabeth Bales Frank’s recent reference to Katherine Anne Porter’s Pale Horse, Pale Rider, also lingers in my […]

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