Tag Archives: Library School

Even Bobcats Get the Blues

 

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Ollie had a rough weekend, apparently, like most of us last weekend, and decided to leave her enclosure at the Washington Zoo, which she shared with two male bobcats. The full headline of the article in The New York Times was “Ollie, a Standoffish Bobcat, is Missing From the National Zoo.” The Times was merely quoting the Zoo’s “curator of great cats” (why, I wonder, has my library school never posted a position quite that cool-sounding on the school listserv?), who described her in rather lengthy and judgmental detail, adding that she was “not super friendly,” and that “it would be extremely easy on us if she were a cat who would come when called, but that’s not who this individual is.”

I puzzled that the curator of great cats was so perturbed by her aloofness. Is he not the curator of great cats? Has he met a cat? Does he taxonomize them by friendliness, rather than species? Are Ollie’s two enclosure-mates models of affability? The curator of great cats added crankily, “We’re looking for a cat who could literally be sitting in a tree right next to us,” as if elusiveness and tree-climbing were traits peculiar to “this individual.” (And who refers to a cat as an “individual”? Back in my youth, “individual” and “this person” were ways in which my gay friends would seek my romantic advice without outing themselves: “This individual is very possessive, so I don’t want to upset this person.”)

On the #Ollie the Bobcat Twitter feed (because of course), one individual tweeted: “Ollie has been criticized as “very standoffish” and “not super friendly.” Because I guess there’s no right way to be a female BOBCAT either.”

And then Ollie returned. Or perhaps she never left. (She could have literally been sitting in a tree right next to us.) She was spotted near the birdcage by a keen-eyed tourist and returned to her enclosure, after receiving two stitches in her left paw and a round of booster shots.

Her escapades generated twelve pages of news headlines on Google. Ollie stories were reported in France and the U.K., and her return provoked a number of think pieces in which she was used as a great symbol of whatever the writer had in mind.

“She was every American worker, underappreciated, shunted to the side,” wrote Petula Dvorak in The Washington Post. “The bobcat habitat wasn’t even on the zoo’s main circle around Big Cat mountain, just a little culvert, no more glamorous than the accounts payable or customer service department.”

This is the only news I wanted to follow this week.

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This is All the Hair You Get

Yesterday was my birthday and when I looked in the mirror, I realized I had Lady Hair.  It’s not quite “the helmet.”  I don’t set it in rollers or cover it in hairspray (does anyone do that anymore?) but it’s definitely short in the “this is all the hair you get” way rather than the “this flatters my face” way.  Last fall I walked into the salon and told my stylist, “Let’s just end this.”  “This” being the ends that would never re-ravel and grow healthy, but would always remain split, and broken, until I cut them off.

This is a metaphor, you see.

This week the weather began to flirt with spring and one morning I decided that I could resume the ritual of my morning walk.  My morning walk means I forego the subway and walk about a mile and a half to catch a bus which will take me over the Queensboro Bridge and drop me off a mere block from my office.  While walking through Astoria’s still (but threatened) pleasantly residential streets, I listen to podcasts.  Monday, I started with This American Life (“TAL”).

And it was devastating.

This week’s episode explored some happy-clappy initiative a decade back where extremely poor high school students in the South Bronx were paired up with pen pals at an elite ($43,000 a year in tuition.  For high school.) Westchester private school.  One day there was a field trip.  The Bronx students piled into a bus and were released three miles later (the episode is called “Three Miles”) onto a verdant, hilly campus with a pool, a dance studio, and a freestanding library.

And one Bronx student, Melanie, had a meltdown.

She realized at that moment, she told the TAL reporter who tracked her down with no little difficulty ten years later, that the game was rigged.  Potential was a lie.  The elite students would be doctors, lawyers, professionals, while she and her classmates would grow up to mop their floors and hold their doors.  Melanie was bright and driven.  She had been outraged at her surroundings on her first day of high school, a day she had happily anticipated all her life.  She knew she deserved better.  Her high school had no library, no gym, no cafeteria, no playground, and she appears to have achieved her education mostly on her own.  She earned a spot to complete for one of the scholarship granted by The Posse Foundation (the process, however well-intended, comes off as a bit callous and dismissive).   She made it to the final round for a full ride to Middlebury College.  And then she was rejected.

“Devastated” is an overused word, but here are the actions taken by the 17 year old Melanie after she was rejected by the Posse Foundation.  She didn’t apply to any other college.  She didn’t apply to a state college, where she might have thrived among more similar students.  She didn’t apply to a city college, or one of the borough community colleges.  She was a loser, in her own eyes.  Worthless.  She hated herself for not getting into Middlebury.  Her sense of failure and shame became her Scarlet Letter.  She took her GED exam, left high school before her classmates graduated, and vanished from the lives of everyone who cared about her.  It took the TAL reporter serious legwork to track Melanie down.  Melanie now works in a grocery store on Sixth Avenue.  She has a boyfriend, she takes the occasional college course, but she has words for the guidance counselors and careworn teachers of her high school, who had been startled out of their besiegement by her “potential”:  “Be fuckin’ realistic.  Don’t tell me I can ‘achieve anything.’  Don’t tell me I can go to Harvard.  Be fuckin’ realistic.”

Having been held up as a beacon of what is possible was too much of a burden, particularly when there was no one to share that burden, no role models, no educated parents, no community support.  (TAL went on to explore Posse Foundation students who did make it to college, only to flounder there as strangers in a strange land, too ashamed of their poverty, their lack of resources, and their “otherness” to even ask for help.)

Which brings me back to me.  What is possible, with what is left?  I started library school with the idea that it would open up for me a whole new world.  And now I believe it can only enhance the world I have.  Not a small thing, but a different thing.  I’m not going to switch careers, most likely, in the late innings of my working life.  Unless my circumstances change by a choice not made by me, I’m staying put, and getting better at what I do where I do it.  My classmates, mainly debt-soaked, idealistic, magical-thinking twenty-somethings (“Oh, I know I’ll never pay off my loans!”), chatter happily about “user experience” and “information architecture,” and while I grumpily acknowledge that while these are good things to learn, I know that given the choice between a newly-minted MLIS graduate who grew up coding and whose work experience consists of unpaid internships, and a newly-minted MLIS graduate with twenty-five years of experience (and who remembers DOS) in the well-compensated corporate world, who wouldn’t choose the newer, cheaper model?

This degree is a walking stick, not a stepping stone.

Be fuckin’ realistic.

I have been struggling this semester because I have been trying to secure representation for a novel while writing another novel.  I am also enrolled in two classes, one of them with an aloof hipster tech-snob professor (who has little interest in teaching, let alone teaching middle-aged students who ask questions), all while working more than 40 hours a week at a major international law firm, where I perform work I take pleasure in doing well.

Work, school, writing.  In order of importance according to passion:  writing, work, school.  In order of importance according to being fuckin’ realistic:  writing, work, school.

Soooooo . . . not so good at school as I’d have liked to be.  Not so much a literary genius in the marketplace at writing as I had hoped when I set out.  Strangely contented in my work life, which is down I suppose to my being fuckin’ realistic.  This is all the hair I get.